Tomorrow CAN be a New Day

PTSD UK is the only charity in the UK dedicated to raising awareness of post-traumatic stress disorder – no matter the trauma that caused it.

Please help us continue the work we do by donating today (thank you!)

What can cause PTSD?

PTSD can affect anyone who has been exposed to a traumatic event – an event which provoked fear, helplessness, or horror in response to the threat of injury or death and therefore can affect anyone.

 

What are the symptoms of PTSD?

PTSD can cause a wide variety of physical, mental and emotional symptoms such as hypervigilance, irrational anger & fear, panic attacks, flashbacks, digestive issues, feeling numb, nightmares and exhaustion. 

 

What are the treatments for PTSD?

It is possible for PTSD to be successfully treated with psychotherapies such has EMDR and CBT, even many years after the traumatic event occurred, which means it is never too late to seek help.

Are you looking to donate or fundraise for PTSD UK?

THANK YOU!!  We are a small charity so our main goals at the moment are to increase awareness that we exist (so people can get the support and information they need) and to maximise fundraising to allow us to achieve our mission of supporting everyone in the UK affected by PTSD, no matter the trauma that caused it.

Do you need more information about PTSD?

Our website has lots of information about PTSD to arm you with the knowledge and details you need to understand the condition, be able to explain it to your friends and family better and, ultimately, to help guide you to the support and treatment you may need. Below are some direct links to some of the most common questions we are asked.

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?

Anyone exposed to trauma can develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and it can cause a wide variety of physical, mental and emotional symptoms – find out more about PTSD on this page here.

I think I might have PTSD, what should I do?

If you recognise some of the symptoms of PTSD in yourself, it’s really important to speak to someone if you feel you can. This might be a friend or loved one initially, but seeing a medical professional will also allow you to get a full diagnosis, understand your condition better, and most importantly, find out what treatment options are available for you. Find out more about what to do if you think you have PTSD on this page here

I think my loved one has PTSD, what can I do?

If you think your partner may have PTSD, its important to let them know you care and are there to listen when they are ready to talk. The changes in you loved one, and the relationship you have, can understandably make you worried, and even perhaps angry, frustrated or hurt, so it’s important that you are patient with your loved one, and deal with this together – they may not have PTSD, but just need more time to process a trauma they went through. Find out more about how to help support your loved one here.

I've just been told I have PTSD, what can I do next?

If you have recently been told you have PTSD then you might feel worried or frightened by what this diagnosis means. Perhaps having a name for how you have been feeling up until now has given you some comfort. No matter how you feel, the biggest thing to know is that you aren’t alone. Find out more about the next steps you might want to take after your diagnosis here.

What treatments are available for PTSD in the UK?

It is possible for PTSD to be successfully treated many years after the traumatic event occurred, which means it is never too late to seek help. For some, the first step may be watchful waiting, then exploring therapeutic options such as individual or group therapy. NICE guidance recommends treatments such as EMDR,  cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).  Find out more about the treatment options for PTSD in the UK here.

What can I do to ease my PTSD symptoms?

There are several therapies, activities or practices which can be useful in easing and reducing PTSD symptoms, you can find out about some of these here. Our PTSD UK blog is also full of suggestions which many people find that useful to alleviate the symptoms of PTSD, particularly anxiety related ones. You can also read about some practical tips to help with PTSD symptoms (particualrly relating to hypervigilance) here.

Meditation and PTSD

How meditation can ease PTSD symptoms There are abundant misconceptions about meditation. Including that it always involves clearing your mind, in silence, to create spiritual enlightenment. The stereotypical meditative pose is sitting crossed-legged on the floor, with your hands either

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The Havening Technique and PTSD

The Havening Technique for PTSD The Havening Technique – more formally known as Amygdala Depotentiation – is a psychosensory therapy used to address deep rooted anxiety, rumination, and severe, instinctive negative responses. The name Havening comes from the fact it

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How Acupuncture has helped some PTSD Sufferers

Alongside prescribed medicine and treatments such as EMDR and CBT, there are also a lot of natural methods available for relieving PTSD symptoms. One of these is acupuncture, which many research studies have shown to be effective for treating post-traumatic

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How fidget spinners can help PTSD sufferers

How fidget spinners can help PTSD sufferers The power of distraction. It’s an amazing tool in many situations, from calming fretful toddlers to helping adults though the ravages of chronic anxiety. It’s also a way for people to manage the

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The link between PTSD and alcoholism

The link between PTSD and alcoholism In the UK, nearly 40% of people with a substance misuse disorder (including alcohol) also have a PTSD diagnosis. Research also shows that people with PTSD are around four times more likely to be

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How dogs can help people with PTSD

How dogs can help people with PTSD Most pet owners are clear about the immediate joys that come with sharing their lives with companion animals. However, many of us remain unaware of the physical and mental health benefits that can

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How yoga can help ease PTSD symptoms

Typically consisting of ‘pranayama’ (breathing exercises), ‘asanas’ (stretching and posture work), and meditation, yoga teaches individuals how to befriend their bodies, and therefore be better equipped to navigate the complexities of trauma and its physiological effects. This article will answer

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The link between COVID-19 and PTSD

The term ‘unprecedented times’ almost doesn’t cover it: a healthcare crisis on a global scale – and it’s still ongoing. Nobody can say with any certainty how many people will be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, or in what ways.

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Crowdfunding for our Outreach Project

We’re excited to announce we’ve been selected for the Aviva Community Fund, and so we’ve just launched our first crowdfunding page to undertake some vital outreach work to reach the most vulnerable and at-risk communities. It’s estimated that 70% of

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Treatments for PTSD

It is possible for PTSD to be successfully treated many years after the traumatic event occurred, which means it is never too late to seek help. For some, the first step may be watchful waiting, then exploring therapeutic options such as individual or group therapy – but the main treatment options in the UK are psychological treatments such as Eye Movement Desensitisation Reprogramming (EMDR) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

Traumatic events can be very difficult to come to terms with, but confronting and understanding your feelings and seeking professional help is often the only way of effectively treating PTSD. You can find out more in the links below, or here.